Good cheer and garlic scapes

I just have to share this beauty from Elizabeth Gilbert’s Big Magic: “Put yourself forward in stubborn good cheer, and then do it again and again and again.”

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It’s a bit of an eye-popper for me as my life is taking a distinct about-turn and I’m again hurtling down a path towards the unknown, with confidence knocked slightly askew and my old friend, Madame Fear, stopping by to visit more frequently. Ah, but this is My Life, and I have chosen to embrace the adventure wholeheartedly and with great daring. Fortunately, I have lots of tools to navigate the more uncertain times, and heaps of hope, and way more courage than in times ago. And…well, I’m excited to see what turns up because it’s always grand and growth-inducing and empowering.

Yay. (I think?)

Yes. Yay!

And so, as I gobble up Liz’s book (I’ve been reading it every morning while I dry my hair. Isn’t that a fine time to take in a good read?), I saw this line and I got goosebumps and realized it was exactly what I needed to see. I’ve been reciting it and re-feeling the goosies all week. And I’ve been heeding her advice – I’m being doggedly cheerful despite moments of doubt and fear and I’m reaching out to all and sundry around me to help me manifest MY NEXT BIG THING.

And I will.

(Right?)

Right!

Thanks, Elizabeth Gilbert, for your nub of wisdom!

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Now for a good switch-gear. I MUST talk about garlic scapes! Those amazing curly green tails of garlicky goodness that I anticipate each summer with hand-rubbing glee. I simply adore a good scape!

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Basically, garlic scapes are flower stalks that spring out of the garlic bulb, and boast a milder, more delicate garlicky flavour. They offer many of the same health benefits as the bulb – like allium compounds that inhibit the enzymes responsible for breaking down bone tissue, and sulphur compounds with anti-cancer properties and that boost glutathione, the body’s most powerful antioxidant. The volatile oil found in both bulbs and scapes not only gives them their distinct flavour but helps protect the liver and kidneys from oxidative damage.

Whew! Such healthy goodness – and so divinely flavourful!

I’ve been keeping it simple all week – oiling and sea salting my scapes, tossing them on a baking sheet and roasting til lightly browned. A handful of these twisted tails atop your dinner plate makes for a bit of show-off glam!

That said, I’ve come across this Julie Daniluk summer dip recipe with peas and garlic scapes as its stars, and I intend to whip it up soon:

Pea-Scape Dip

Ingredients

3 cups green peas, fresh or thawed (from frozen)

1 cup garlic scapes, chopped

2 T extra virgin olive oil

¼ cup fresh lemon juice

½ cup water

¼ tsp sea salt (or to taste)

2 T hemp hearts (optional)

Preparation

Combine all ingredients in a food processor, and blend to creamy smoothness. Serve with crackers and fresh veggies. Makes 3 cups.

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